All Higley 1000 Neighborhoods by Metropolitan Area

All Higley 1000 Neighborhoods by Metropolitan Area

Below is the list of all of the Higley 1000 neighborhoods. If any of my readers would suggest a ‘better’ name for any of the below, I’m listening. Due to the huge number of New York City neighborhoods, I  has been broken New York City into Connecticut, Long Island, New Jersey, New York City, and Westchester. Similarly, I have broken up Miami, San Francisco, Los Angeles, and Washington DC.

Nine states had no representation in the Higley 1000. The thousandth neighborhood in the Higley 1000 is La Canada in suburban Los Angeles. It is the “poorer” half of La Canada-Flintridge (Fintridge is 439th). La Canada’s mean household income in 2010 was $239,742. Here are the highest income block groups in each of the nine states without representation in the Higley 1000.

  1. New Hampshire: Bedford Hills Common Area in the town of Bedford outside of Manchester: $234,327
  2. Wyoming: Jackson Hole; a huge block group of 773 square miles that is north of Jackson, Wyoming: $227,889
  3. Iowa: a block group in West Des Moines that is centered on 58th St.: $221,168
  4. New Mexico: the western section of the Tanoa Country Club in Albuquerque: $199,569
  5. Vermont: The Lake Champlain waterfront in Charlotte, Vermont: $198,813
  6. Montana: The Yellowstone Country Club in northwestern Billings: $190,015
  7. North Dakota: Circle Hills Drive along the Red River in southern Grand Forks: $174,072
  8. Idaho: The Crane Creek Country Club in Boise: $171,500
  9. Maine: The Woodlands Club in Falmouth, Maine (suburban Portland): $169,258

Considering the list of states, the number of minorities in each neighborhood is miniscule. The exception is New Mexico where the Tanoa Country Club’s western section was 17.5% Latino and 6.9% Asian.

The Higley 1000 by Metro Area:

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Posted in Exclusive Neighborhoods, General, Metro Briefs, Racial Diversity, The US Census on Mar 4th, 2014, 7:26 pm by Stephen Higley   

31 Responses to “All Higley 1000 Neighborhoods by Metropolitan Area”

  1. Jill Schwartz
    March 15th, 2014 | 10:46 am

    I encourage you strongly to take another look at your data. It is IMPOSSIBLE that the median income for South Fitchburg, Massachusetts (near Worcester) is $255,000. Fitchburg is one of the poorest communities in Massachusetts and South Fitchburg is not significantly different from the rest of Fitchburg. According to Wikipedia, the median income across the whole city is $47,000.

  2. Stephen Higley
    March 16th, 2014 | 8:10 pm

    This is one that slipped by me. It will be removed. Only goes to show just how wrong the Census can be! Thanks!

  3. March 18th, 2014 | 9:47 am

    The Cochella Valley, Palm Springs Las Palmas and Indian Wells and Rancho Mirage etc have
    Very wealthy neighborhoods. How did they escape?

  4. Peter
    March 18th, 2014 | 1:52 pm

    Are there links to the maps showing the exact neighborhood boundaries used in this latest list?

  5. Alan Gregg Cohen
    March 18th, 2014 | 7:47 pm

    Just for your edification, the Higley 1000 neighborhood in New York City, which you have listed as #17 Douglastown Manor(Queens)Higley 1000 #246, is incorrectly spelled/named. The neighborhood you are referring to is known as “Douglas Manor”, and it’s postal mailing address is “Douglaston, NY 11363”. Only neighborhoods that are located in Queens, do not use the borough name as their mailing address. You can verify all this information in the Wikipedia entry on Douglaston, Queens.

  6. whey wrong
    March 18th, 2014 | 8:28 pm

    There is no way Alapocas could or should be on this list. You would be hard pressed to find a house over 1.5 million in that neighborhood. You should recheck for this area

  7. Stephen Higley
    March 18th, 2014 | 8:53 pm

    I looked into the numbers and there are a number of things that have conspired to give Alapocas an exalted ranking. First and most important, the block group that makes up this neighborhood is small. It just barely made the population threshold. The smaller the population, the greater the variability in the accuracy of the data. Another contributing factor may be that the neighborhood is very homogeneous. The houses seem to range in price from about $450,000 to $800,000: nice, but a bit downscale compared to other neighborhoods with similar mean household income.

    The exact ranking of Alapocas is not the point. The point is that it is a very lovely Wilmington neighborhood. It may not be no Greenville, but, it’s still ain’t chopped liver. Okay, maybe it sneaked higher on the list than it should be… is it integrated?

  8. Stephen Higley
    March 18th, 2014 | 8:58 pm

    Thanks, I’ll make the change you have pointed out to the master list. It will eventually replace the tables once I’ve collected some more great corrections from people like you.

  9. Stephen Higley
    March 18th, 2014 | 9:01 pm

    Too many retirees? The absence of Palm Springs area block groups has always mystified me. I’ve checked and rechecked my data. Maybe few rich people choose to make their Palm Springs area their year round house as the summers are just too brutal. I should know, I spend my summers in Tucson!

  10. Stephen Higley
    March 18th, 2014 | 9:02 pm

    I haven’t gotten that far this time around.

  11. Alan Gregg Cohen
    March 19th, 2014 | 10:27 am

    The absense of Palm Springs area block groups is definitely for the reason you gave. Atleast 50% of the residents here spend less than 6 months in residence here, and claim many of the other Highley 1000 neighborhoods as their permanent residences, not truly reflecting the apparent wealth of many neighborhoods in the area. Unfortunately this is in stark contrast to the median sales prices of homes in many of the local block groups in the area, and in contrast to the high end shopping that is omnipresent on El Paseo, Palm Desert’s equivalent to Rodeo Drive in Beverly Hills, or Worth Avenue in Palm Beach.

  12. March 20th, 2014 | 2:11 pm

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  13. Jo-Ann Neuhaus
    March 21st, 2014 | 1:02 pm

    I grew up in scarsdale and find your neighborhood designations to be quite different from my experience. I would designate the neighborhoods as follows: Heathcote (where my family lived), Quaker Ridge, Secor Farms, Murray Hill (definitely larger lot development than any other neighborhood), Fox Meadow, Green Acres, Edgewood on one side of the Post Road and Edgewood on the Village side of the White Plains Post Road,and finally, the Village area itself, which with elevator apartment buildings has little physical and sociological relationship to the remaining single family development in Scarsdale.

    I also lived in Bethesda and do not recognize some of the neighborhoods named. Given that Woodacres, which is on the east side of Massachusetts Avenue is on the list as is Brookmont, which is on the west side of Macarthur Blvd., I would guess that the neighborhood north of Sangamore Road between Massachusetts Ave.and MacArthur Blvd. are among the listed neighborhoods – actually about 3 smaller neighborhoods, including Mohican Hills and Tulip Hills – but what have you named this Neighborhood?

    Last, if the income is based on census data, there is or can be some discrepency in DC. For purposes of taxation or even more important to some, voting rights, quite a number of residents with second homes elsewhere in the States, list that home as their primary residence. I know this for a fact. So the census population figures are actually an undercount. Moreover, in my current DC neighborhood, Penn Quarter, I spoke to property managers who reported their occupancy around the time of the census. The block by block count in those blocks was quite lower than the occupancy ratees reported, leaving me with the impression that the census data under counted the population. We hypothosized that many of these residents were declaring their residency elsewhere. I was just curious how you would address this.

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  17. Charles Haffey
    April 7th, 2014 | 7:06 am

    Delray Beach is in Palm Beach County, not Broward, (where I live.)

  18. April 7th, 2014 | 8:02 am

    […] in the city, and #243 in the country with a median household income of $316,140, according to the Higley 1000 survey. Curbed.com notes that the neighborhood boundaries used in this case leave a lot to […]

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  25. Stephen Higley
    April 8th, 2014 | 2:18 pm

    Will correct in the next iteration. Thanks!!

  26. melspeth
    April 30th, 2014 | 8:17 pm

    Forest Hills beats Cobble Hill, the Upper East Side, and Soho? No it definitely does not. Also Brooklyn Heights isn’t on the list? Unlikely.

  27. Stephen Higley
    May 4th, 2014 | 12:00 pm

    Forest Hills consists of the two richest block groups: the million dollar single family homes. Cobble Hill had on block group so it is a bit misleading. The Upper East Side has thousands of rentals… which always brings the mean down. Brooklyn Heights is on the list.

  28. janet
    May 13th, 2014 | 4:31 pm

    wilmington,de any info

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